Critical Data Sources for External Threat Hunting
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Critical Data Sources for External Threat Hunting

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Critical Data Sources for External Threat Hunting

By AMSAT Jan 26,2021

Critical Data Sources for External Threat Hunting

That strong intelligence begins with good sources goes without saying. And when it comes to gaining the most context around suspicious events or rivals of interest, nothing is more crucial than external hunting.

Most existing threat hunting is duly focused on hunting inside the firewalls of an organization, but often, security teams are unable to arrive at decisive conclusions due to significant visibility breaks and a want of effective log aggregation.

A number of enterprises take years to establish a threat hunting team within a security operations center. In this context, secure remote access is a vital component of any healthy application pile, working with other elements such as DNS and TLS to ensure your applications are constantly protected and efficient. Policy and business considerations between human resources, legal, IT, and engineering need to develop and the business has to make the budget work.

While a majority of organizations are constantly evaluating the cost-benefit analysis of storing, aggregating, and examining their own data to carry out internal threat hunting, they ought to comprehend that external threat hunting can radically raise the setting used in internal threat hunting, allowing swifter times to spot and respond.

Passive DNS

This is a system of record that stores DNS resolution data for a given place, record, and time period. This historical resolution data set lets experts view which areas resolved to an IP address and the other way around. This data set allows for time-based association based on domain or IP overlap.

Most of these IPs and hosts are controllers typically managed by hackers and cybercriminals. Some of these host names and IP addresses striking the internally collected logs can be used by passive DNS to recognize supplementary host names and IP addresses that a network protector might not have seen through preliminary examination on the internally-collected logs.

 

Global Netflow

On the inside, the netflow practice is used by IT experts as a network traffic evaluator to find its point of source, destination, volume and paths on the network. Using internally collected logs such as application and firewall logs, you can consider being able to cross reference that internal data of similar type but different collection activity external to the enterprise.

External netflow is significant since it allows for storing huge amounts of traffic data over time without the large storage condition of full-packet capture.

Mobile Data


Mobile data and adtech data collection are used to target ads to users through mobile apps and browser data.  This data can occasionally comprise personal information but more often than not comprises a unique marketing identifier that does not recognize an individual by name but rather by characteristics and history.

Some of these characteristics related to your ad ID include WiFi networks that you have connected to, IP addresses the device has been allocated, physical site, model of phone/computer, browser version and, in some cases, profounder historical data positioned around buying interests. Using this data, a hunter can recognize a single device by IP or location and follow that device chronologically to find out activities that device conducted from different addresses and networks.

 

Aggregation of Scanning Traffic

One of the key issues with scanning traffic hitting external applications and devices is the sheer number of systems on the internet that are regularly skimming for open services and crawling applications for indexing. A brief look at any firewall or application log without any sort of sifting can be awe-inspiring and time-consuming.

This is where services that sieve the noise from recognized scanning hosts and underline more focused investigation of devices and applications are very beneficial.  These services supervise scanning activity using several listening posts on the internet as well as combined threat intelligence.

They then use data from these listening posts and threat intelligence to help recognize hosts that are of slight interest and can be sifted from logs when looking for targeted probing and attack setup.

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  • DNS
  • Data Sources

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    A-Brief-Weekly-Review-of-Top-Stories-that-Dominated-the-Cyberworld
    Posted in Cyber Security

    A Brief Weekly Review of Top Stories that Dominated the Cyberworld

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    A-Brief-Weekly-Review-of-Top-Stories-that-Dominated-the-Cyberworld

    By AMSAT Jan 22,2020

    A Brief Weekly Review of Top Stories that Dominated the Cyberworld

     

    While a number of developments occurred on the cyber front in the outgoing week, some stories stood out in terms of their distinctiveness and far-reaching consequences for the cybersecurity landscape. 

     

    From the news of hackers who leaked stolen Covid-19 vaccine documents of the European Medicines Agency to a data breach that hit OpenWRT over the weekend, the cyberworld saw many developments that once again raised questions about the security protocols of some of the world’s leading enterprises.

     

    Here’s a brief summary of the top news items that shook the world of cybersecurity.  

     

    EU regulator said hackers ‘manipulated’ stolen vaccine documents 

    The European Medicines Agency, the European Union’s drug regulator, said that coronavirus vaccine documents hackers stole from its servers had been both leaked and manipulated. 

     

    The regulator further said that an ongoing probe exposed that hackers received emails and documents from November linked to the evaluation of experimental coronavirus vaccines. The agency had substantial confidential COVID-19 data as part of its vaccine approval process.

    OpenWRT revealed data breach occurred over weekend

    OpenWRT, an open-source project that provides free and customizable firmware for home routers, revealed a security breach that happened on Saturday, January 16, after an attacker accessed the account of a forum administrator.

     

    OpenWRT said that while the hacker could not download a full copy of its database, the attack did download a list of forum users, which included personal details such as forum usernames and email addresses.

     

    Malwarebytes was hacked by the same group that breached SolarWinds 

    Cybersecurity firm Malwarebytes said that it was hacked by the same group that breached IT software company SolarWinds last year, adding to the rising list of key security companies targeted by the group.

     

    A Malwarebytes spokeswoman, in an emailed statement, said based on the methods of the attack, the company believed it was “the same threat actor” that attacked SolarWinds. 

     

    Google disclosed fixed bugs in Signal, FB Messenger, JioChat apps

    In January 2019, a serious vulnerability was reported in Apple’s FaceTime group chats feature that enabled users to begin a FaceTime video call and listen in on targets by adding their own number as a third person in a group chat even before the individual on the other end accepted the incoming call.

     

    The weakness was believed to be so serious that the iPhone maker detached the FaceTime group chats feature altogether before the issue was fixed in a following iOS update.

     

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    • OpenWRT
    • Malwarebytes

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      all-you-need-to-know-about-external-vs-internal-penetration-tests
      Posted in Cyber Security

      All You Need to Know about External vs Internal Penetration Tests

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      all-you-need-to-know-about-external-vs-internal-penetration-tests

      By AMSAT Jan 20,2021

      All You Need to Know about External vs Internal Penetration Tests

      Penetration testing, also called ethical hacking, is the exercise of reviewing the security flaws of application software, networks, computers and devices, wireless systems, and employees. Penetration tests can be either external or internal depending on the goal of the project.

      An external penetration test seeks to misuse flaws that could be carried out by an external user without appropriate access and authorizations. An internal penetration test is similar to a vulnerability evaluation; nevertheless, it takes an examination one step further by seeking to exploit the flaws and ascertain what information is actually exposed.

      External Penetration Test

      External penetration testing comprises testing flaws to review the likelihoods of being attacked by any remote attacker. By exploiting the found vulnerabilities it recognizes the information being revealed to outsiders.

      The major goal of this test is to pretend an attack on the internal network by imitating the actions of an actual hacker.

      This type of penetration testing seeks to find and misuse flaws of a system to make off with or adversely affect the organization’s information. Consequently, the test will reveal whether the employed security measures are sufficient to secure an organization and to evaluate its ability to protect against any external attack.

      An external penetration test typically takes three weeks to complete; nevertheless, this hinges on the intricacy of the system, the size of the network, and the objectives of the test itself

      Examples of external penetration tests include:

      Configuration & Deployment Management Testing

      Identity Management Testing

      Authentication Testing

      Authorization Testing

      Session Management Testing, Input Validation Testing

      Testing for weak Cryptography

      Business Logic Testing

      Client-Side Testing

      Testing for Error Handling.

      Testing methodologies include: 

      Footprinting

      Checking for public information and other information leakages

      System Scanning/Port Scanning/Service Scanning for flaws

      Manual testing identified flaws

      IDS/IPS Testing

      Password Strength Testing

       

      Internal Penetration Test 

      An internal penetration test employs a different method of tackling the attacks and only bets highlighted once it completes an external penetration test. In this test, the key focus is to recognize what a hacker with internal access to your network could achieve. 

      Make sure you have the following checklist on hand before engaging with a vendor: 

      Your objectives for conducting a pen test

      The number of internal workstations on the network

      The number of servers

      The total number of internal and external IPs.

       

      Internal penetration tests include using:

       

      Computer Systems
      Access Points
      WiFi Networks
      Firewalls
      IDS/IPS
      Local Servers
      Employees

       

      Once those flaws have been identified, testers exploit them to determine the effect of an attack and show the defects/entry points to the organization. 

       

      Internal penetration testing is not just restricted to abusing internal network flaws, but it also comprises privilege escalation, malware spreading, man in the middle attacks (MITM), credential stealing, monitoring, information leakage or any other mean activity.

       

      Testing methodologies include:

       
      Internal Network Scanning
      Port Scanning and System Fingerprinting
      Finding vulnerabilities
      Exploiting
      Manual Vulnerability Testing and Verification
      Firewall and ACL Testing
      Administrator Privileges Escalation Testing
      Password Strength Testing
      Network Equipment Security Controls Testing
      Database Security Controls Testing
      Internal Network Scan for Known Trojans
      Third-Party/Vendor Security Configuration Testing
       

      Popular tools used in internal penetration testing:

       
      Nmap
      Wireshark
      Burp Suite Pro
      Dirbuster/Dirb/GoBuster
      Nikto
      Sqlmap
      Nessus
      Responder
      Metasploit Framework
      Nmap
      Hydra
      Bettercap/Ettercap
      Hashcat/John the Ripper
      Custom Scripts
       

      Takeaway

       
      To prevent your organization from possible breaches and strengthen existing security controls against an expert hacker, a number of companies on the internet offer penetration testing services based on a custom plan of a multistep attack that targets custom network infrastructure and applications. For every enterprise, it’s best practice to carry out an external and internal penetration test along with consistent security reviews to confirm the security of their IT System and determine what information can be revealed to the hackers.

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      • External Penetration Tests

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        cybersecurity-weekly-news-roundup-for-2nd-week-of-january
        Posted in Cyber Security

        Cybersecurity Weekly News Roundup for 2nd Week of January

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        cybersecurity-weekly-news-roundup-for-2nd-week-of-january

        By AMSAT Jan 15,2021

        Cybersecurity Weekly News Roundup for 2nd Week of January

        The outgoing week saw a handful of incidents that took the cyberworld by storm. From a New Zealand central bank’s IT system breach in a cyberattack to the German police taking down the world’s most notorious darknet marketplace to Facebook-owned messaging app WhatsApp sparking a furor by dropping a bombshell with regard to its user policy, the world of cybersecurity was witness to events that had a sweeping impact on the world of cybersecurity.  

         

        Here is the review of the stories that made headlines in the week gone by.

        New Zealand central bank IT system breached in cyberattack

        The Reserve Bank of New Zealand, New Zealand’s central bank, reeled from the impact of a breach of a third-party file-sharing system used to share and store information. The bank, however, said that the attack was not specifically aimed at it, and other users of the file-sharing system from Accellion, known as File Transfer Application, were also compromised.

        German Police Took Down ‘World’s Largest Darknet Marketplace’

        A German-led police operation took down the “world’s largest” darknet marketplace, which had been used to facilitate the sale of drugs, stolen credit card data and malware. The marketplace called DarkMarket, as per media reports, had almost 500,000 users and more than 2,400 vendors worldwide. A total of at least 320,000 transactions were carried out via the marketplace, with more than 4,650 bitcoin and 12,800 monero.

        WhatsApp’s Privacy Policy Forced Users to Move to Rivals

        WhatsApp reassured users about privacy at the Facebook-owned messaging service as people moved to rivals Telegram and Signal following a tweak to its terms. WhatsApp’s new terms sparked censure, as users outside Europe who do not accept the new conditions before February 8 will be cut off from the messaging app.

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          Evaluating-User-and-Attacker-Behavior-Analytics
          Posted in Cyber Security

          Evaluating User and Attacker Behavior Analytics

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          evaluating-user-and-attacker-behavior-analytics

          By AMSAT Jan 13,2021

          Evaluating User and Attacker Behavior Analytics

          User behavior analytics helps an organization gain a baseline comprehension of what standard behavior for an employee would be; for example, what kind of data they access, what times they log on, and where they are physically located. That way, an unexpected outlier in behavior—such as a 3 am logon in Bangkok from someone who typically works from 10 to 6 in London and doesn’t travel for business—stands out as uncommon behavior and something a security analyst may need to probe.

          With attacker behavior analytics, there’s no baseline of activity to compare information to; rather, small, apparently disparate activities spotted on the network over time may in fact be breadcrumbs of activity that a threat actor leaves behind. Both technology and human are needed to put these pieces together, but they can help form a picture of what a threat actor may be up to within an organization’s network.

          Setting Prowler Traps

          Some targets are just too alluring for a hacker to keep away from. Security experts are cognizant of this fact, so they set traps on the back of hopes that an attacker will take the bait. Against the backdrop of an organization’s network, an intruder trap could include a special target that may appear to house network services—particularly tempting to an attacker. When a hacker goes after this lure, it causes an alert so the security team know there is wary activity in the network that should be examined. 

          Steering Threat Hunts

          Rather than wait for a threat to appear in the organization’s network, a threat hunt allows security experts to vigorously go out into their own network, endpoints, and security technology to look for threats or invaders that may be prowling as-yet unnoticed. This is an unconventional technique commonly performed by expert security and threat experts. 

          Preferably, a well-developed security threat finding program should include all of the above strategies, amongst others, to oversee the security of the organization’s employees, data, and important assets.

          A Two-Pronged Approach is Needed to Threat Detection 

          Threat detection requires both human and technical elements. The human element comprises security experts who evaluate trends, patterns in data, behaviors, and reports, as well as those who can ascertain if irregular data points to a possible threat or a false alarm. 

          However, threat detection technology also plays a cardinal role in the uncovering procedure. There’s no silver bullet in threat detection, and no single tool that will do the job. Instead, a blend of tools serves as a net across an organization’s network, from end to end, to try and seize threats before they become a grave problem.

          A strong threat detection program should employ:

          • Security event threat detection technology to combine data from events across the network, including verification, network access, and logs from critical systems.

          • Network threat detection technology to comprehend traffic patterns on the network and oversee traffic within and between reliable networks, as well as to the internet.

          • Endpoint threat detection technology to provide thorough information about possibly spiteful events on user machines, as well as any behavioral or scientific information to assist in probing threats.

          Takeaway

          By employing a combination of these defensive methods, you’ll be increasing your chances of detecting and mitigating a threat quickly and efficiently. Security is a continuous process, and nothing is guaranteed. It’ll be up to you and the resources and processes you put in place to keep your business as secure as possible.

           

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          • Steering Threat Hunts
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            Posted in Application Security

            Top 5 Application Security Best Practices

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            Top-5-Application-Security-Best-Practices

            By AMSAT Jan 11,2020

            Top 5 Application Security Best Practices

            As applications become more intricate and software development timelines narrow, developers are under pressure to trot out new features at the earliest. Consequently, developers count more profoundly on third-party libraries, mostly open-source components, to attain distinguished and convincing application functionality. This rise in open-source components drives companies to regulate their security practices. One of the ways organizations can protect their software is by espousing application security best practices and combining them into their software development life cycle.

             

            To this end, here are the top 10 application security best practices you should use in your organization.   

             

            1. Track Your Assets 

             

            You can’t secure what you don’t know you have. 

             

            Keeping track of your assets helps you preempt mishaps and disasters in the future. You should ensure you automate the process as much as possible, as it’s a Herculean task for organizations to continue to scale their development. As well as tracking your assets, take the time to categorize them, observing which ones are important to your business roles and which are of less importance. 

             

            2. Carry out a Threat Assessment

             

            Once you have a list of what needs to be protected, you can start to understand what your threats are and how to alleviate them. You also need to know the paths that cybercriminals use to breach your application, while ensuring you have the right security measures in place to spot or thwart an attack. At the same time, you also need to be realistic about expectations for how secure you can be. This implies that even if you take the highest level of defense available, nothing is ever unhackable. You also need to be truthful about what kind of measures you believe your team can maintain in the long term. 

             

            3. Patch your software with updates 

             

            Fixing your software with updates either from commercial vendors or the open-source community is one of the most significant initiatives you can take to ensure the security of your software. When a flaw is correctly exposed and reported to the owners of the product or project, the flaw is then published on security manuals and databases for public consumption. Developers may be cautious to upgrade to the latest version of the software if it could break your product, but automated tools can help enormously here. 

             

            4. Manage Your Containers

             

            Over the last few years, containers have gained immense traction as more organizations adopt the technology for its flexibility, making it easier to build, test, and arrange across several environments throughout the SDLC. 

             

            5. Prioritize Your Remediation Ops

             

            In recent years, vulnerabilities have seen a sharp rise, and this trend shows no sign of abating anytime soon. Developers have a hard time when it comes to remediation. Given the magnitude of the task at hand, prioritization is vital for teams that expect to keep their applications safe while upholding their rationality.

             

            Doing so requires carrying out a threat evaluation based on the severity of a flaw, how serious the affected application is to your operations, and many other factors. When it comes to open-source flaws, you ought to know whether your registered code is actually using the susceptible functionality in the open-source component. If the susceptible component’s functionality is not receiving calls from your product, then it is unproductive and not a high risk even if its CVSS rating is grave. A shrewd approach is one that automatically prioritizes the most demanding threats first, taking into account the factors at play, and leaves the low-risk ones for later.   

             

            Takeaway

             

            Staying ahead of cybercriminals is mostly circumventing the common errors that others are likely to make, making yourself a stiffer target to exploit than others. While no perimeter or application security measures are ever fully hack-proof, following these basic best practices goes a long way in making your application not worth the hassle for the hackers, thereby keeping you and your data safe for another day.

             

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            • Security Updates
            • Application Security

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              Cybersecurity Weekly News Roundup for First Week of Jan 2021
              Posted in Cyber Security

              Cybersecurity Weekly News Roundup for First Week of Jan 2021

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              Cybersecurity Weekly News Roundup for First Week of Jan 2021

              By AMSAT Jan 08,2020

              Cybersecurity Weekly News Roundup for First Week of Jan 2021

              With hackers exfiltrating emails to experts warning of new ransomware targeting enterprise networks, the outgoing week has been full of worrying developments in the world of cybersecurity. But one news item that stood out amid all the ominous developments, and which will greatly help the US Army secure its digital assets against cyberattacks, was the US government’s announcement of a Bug Bounty program called ‘Hack the Army 3.0’

               

              Here is the review of the stories that made headlines in the last week.

              US Government Announced ‘Hack the Army 3.0’ Bug Bounty Program

              The U.S. government announced the launch of another bug bounty program, Hack the Army 3.0. The objective of the program is to help the US Army protect its digital assets and systems against cyberattacks, and it’s open to both military and civilian white hat hackers. Nevertheless, only civilians are eligible for financial rewards if they find flaws.

              Not everyone can participate in the program, but the Department of Defense does have an ongoing vulnerability disclosure program through which anyone can report security gaps at any time in return for “thanks.”

              ‘Earth Wendigo’ Hackers Exfiltrated Emails Through JavaScript Backdoor

              A well-orchestrated malware attack campaign had been exfiltrating emails from targeted organizations using a JavaScript backdoor injected into a webmail system extensively used in Taiwan, according to an advisory.

              The advisory said that Earth Wendigo had been targeting multiple organizations, including government entities, research institutions, and universities in Taiwan since May 2019.

              Researchers Warned of New Babuk Ransomware Targeting Enterprise Networks

              Security experts have detected a brand new ransomware family, Babuk, targeting at corporate networks, warning that professional threat actors had already hit several organizations with the file-encryption scheme.

              Reports suggested that Babuk claimed at least four corporate victims facing data recovery extortion attempts.

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              • Cyber Security

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                Six-ways-to-protect-against-digital-threats
                Posted in Digital Threats

                Six ways to protect against digital threats

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                Six-ways-to-protect-against-digital-threats

                By AMSAT Aug 28,2020

                Six ways to protect against digital threats

                The fourth industrial revolution is poised to be driven by two major elements: digitization and connectivity. However, manufacturers ought to adopt cybersecurity to ensure physical assets and intellectual property are sufficiently defended against heist and attack. The digitization of manufacturing is driving industrial operators to attain new levels of output, quality, and visibility.

                Though these are thrilling times in manufacturing, there is a dark side to the swift progress that’s ongoing. Regrettably, more connections also open the door to new security perils, and preceding generations of manufacturing control systems were not perceived with security or IP connectivity in mind.

                 

                Industrial Automation and Control Systems (IACS) conventionally employ proprietary hardware and procedures that are difficult to integrate with network security. Although separated from industrial IP networks, they’re still vulnerable because they’re often set up as simple, open network machine islands, with inadequate or no security. The net result is that digital change is multiplying vulnerabilities at the same time as cyber-attackers are getting more sophisticated.

                 

                As per recent research by Cisco, if cybersecurity fears delay digital execution, it could take up to five years to catch up with the competition. The industrial sector has some of the least developed security protocols and policies and lowest quality security setup, so there’s a very real risk of being left behind.

                Several industrial enterprises don’t have even a simple security policy jotted down. Begin by creating and enforcing a set of written security policies and procedures for your plant that will summarize who should be able to access the network in the first place and how.

                It should encompass permanent employees and outworkers, while also spelling out what assets they can evaluate, define acceptable asset use, and define reporting instruments for events. Written policies should also comprise an incident response plan, including any measures to restore critical production systems following a security event.

                 

                Physical security is key

                 

                Some of the most severe harm comes from within, when entry is gained from the factory floor. Whether it’s foiling inventory lift, data loss or intellectual property theft, businesses can take advantage of a wide-ranging physical security solution combined with a safe wired and wireless industrial network.

                 

                Defend assets with physical access limits like locks, key cards, and video surveillance. Where hands-on, you can also add device verification and authorization, plus encryption.

                 

                Take a rounded approach

                 

                The chances of a breach increase with a rise in more connections in your manufacturing setting. Your network cannot be secured by any single technology, product, or technique. Defending important manufacturing assets needs a rounded approach that uses numerous layers of protection to address different types of threats.

                 

                A rudimentary mapping exercise will help you get started, providing a catalogue of all the devices and software on your network. Remember, ‘air gap’ approaches are imperfect – just because a robot or device isn’t linked to the network doesn’t mean it’s totally safe. One corrupt or malicious thumb drive will put a remote machine at risk of unintended downtime or worse, safety events.

                 

                Isolate your sub-systems

                 

                To establish zones and design schemas to segment and segregate your sub-systems, it’s important to use industry best practices. On the network boundary, firewalls and intrusion detection will help you foil threats, while within the network, using out-of-band deep packet inspection (DPI) in your routers, switches, and other network devices can help you detect viruses, spam, and other intrusions.

                 

                Stop attackers in their tracks

                 

                An important segment of any company’s network architecture spans the internet edge, where the business network meets the public internet. Internet edge is the doorway to cyberspace, and serves numerous roles for the characteristic enterprise network. As network users stretch out to websites and use email for corporate communication, you need to keep your business resources both reachable and protected.

                 

                Takeaway

                 

                 

                In time, manufacturers who rise to the challenge of digitization by enforcing the next generation of security defenses built for the age of the IIoT will gain competitive edge in the process. By thinking holistically and integrating multiple layers of protection, you can defend intellectual property and physical assets from accidental breaches and cyber theft, while accelerating threat resolution, decreasing downtime, and driving productivity gains across your services.

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                • Digital Threats

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                  5-Top-Regulatory-Compliance-Frameworks
                  Posted in Cyber Security

                  5 Top Regulatory Compliance Frameworks

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                  5-Top-Regulatory-Compliance-Frameworks

                  By AMSAT Aug 28,2020

                  Dealing with cyber-threat: a complex challenge

                  To keep abreast with industry best practices and to adhere to technical and other requirements, enterprises today often use frameworks to ensure cybersecurity compliance. These frameworks provide best guidelines to help improve security, enhance business processes, meet regulatory requirements, and carry out other tasks essential to attain specific business objectives such as breaking into a particular market niche or selling to government institutions.

                  There are a number of such frameworks, and the recommendations set out in them can impose tough and often costly requirements on enterprise resources, not least in circumstances where an enterprise is bound by a host of supervisory compliance regimes

                  Cybersecurity Compliance Frameworks

                   

                  These frameworks typically provide recommendations on executing and managing the several aspects of a security program, such as perimeter defense, access control, authentication, encryption, monitoring, reporting, incident response, and risk management. They may also give guidelines on best practices, and fields that should be encompassed in cybersecurity awareness training.

                  These frameworks approach these matters in a particular way, typical of its particular design, and are likely to be influenced by the industry standards or market sector for which they have been designed.

                  The following are some of the leading frameworks highly recommended for cybersecurity compliance purposes.

                  Consortium for IT Software Quality (CISQ)

                  This specific framework has developed standards for automating the measuring of structural quality and the size of software applications. The standards were drawn up based on exploits and flaws recognized by the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), the SANS Institute, and Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE). The standards of this framework are generally used in handling risks like application security.

                  Control Objectives for Information Related Technology (COBIT)

                  More than 25 years ago, the Information Security Audit and Control Association (ISACA) introduced the Control Objectives for Information Related Technology (COBIT) framework to highlight the issue of risk reduction in financial institutions. The latest review of COBIT comprises best practices for aligning information technology functions and procedures and connecting these best practices to business plan.

                  Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP)

                  This framework provides a standardized way for government agencies to assess the risks of cloud-based software solutions and infrastructure platforms. The framework allows existing security evaluations and packages to be reused across many government organizations and is based on the constant monitoring of cloud products and services for real-time cybersecurity.

                  National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

                  This is a division of the US Chamber of Commerce, which deals with cybersecurity issues impacting the operators and managers of serious infrastructure. NIST’s recommendations for manufacturing, quality control, security, and other matters are grounded on the outcomes of consultations with security industry specialists, government agencies, and researchers. The framework offers a set of controls and balances to help infrastructure operators to manage their cybersecurity risks.

                  Privacy Shield

                  The Privacy Shield Framework was recognized to substitute the US-EU Safe Harbor rules which were issued to ensure that US companies complied with European Union (EU) data protection standards when shifting EU data across borders. The framework was intended to minimize and alleviate the risk of meddling when data is transferred between the EU and the USA.

                   

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                  • FedRAMP

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                    Key Features of a File Integrity Monitoring Software
                    Posted in Integrity Monitoring

                    7 Key Features of a File Integrity Monitoring Software

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                    Key Features of a File Integrity Monitoring Software

                    By AMSAT Dec 31,2020

                    7 Key Features of a File Integrity Monitoring Software

                    The growing occurrence of data breaches over the last few years has led to the creation of a number of regulatory standards such as the PCI-DSS. These standards get companies to embrace security best practices, including the need to supervise all types of changes made to server configurations. Although some of these configuration changes have no considerable effect on systems, a few unforeseen changes could put companies at risk, which may also lead to non-compliance.

                     

                    The File Integrity Monitoring Solution

                     

                    To help secure your critical data and maintain compliance, you need to spot changes down to the smallest detail in real time. This is achieved by creating a baseline state and supervising for file changes relative to the baseline. 

                     

                    The problem is that it’s unrealistic to oversee every application or device in your network all the time. Moreover, today’s networks are far too multifaceted to be checked physically, and this reality holds true even in small to mid-sized organizations. Therefore, you need a solution that helps you take over all these changes without the risks of manual editing. And this results in the need for File Integrity Monitoring (FIM).

                     

                    Here are the features you should be looking for when assessing any file integrity monitoring solution.

                    1. Multiple Platform Support

                     

                    A typical organization today commonly runs on Windows, Linux, Solaris, AIX or even HP-UX. So, it’s important to try to find an effective solution than can supervise numerous platforms without incompatibility issues.

                     

                    2. Easy Integration

                    The FIM of your choice should be able to impeccably work with other data security solutions such as associating change data with event and log data. This lets your team swiftly recognize, trace, and relate problem-creating changes with each other.

                     

                    3. Prolonged Perimeter Protection

                     

                    You should opt for an FIM solution that goes beyond change discovery in files and its characteristics. Network devices such as firewalls, routers, switches, and VPN concentrators should also be taken into account by your solution.

                     

                    4. Smarter Change Detection

                     

                    Spotting a change at a minimum means recognizing if a hash of the file has altered. A sturdier FIM solution can look at numerous traits pertaining to a file besides the hash. All of this supplementary metadata offers superior insight of the true nature of the change. For instance, changing the owner of a file does not change its contents, which implies that the hash would remain the same. Nevertheless, a more sophisticated FIM lets you comprehend if the file’s owner has been changed.

                     

                    5. Multi-Level Logging and Simplified Reporting

                     

                    Conventional file integrity monitoring solutions generally operate on each individual machine, with contemporary tools providing a cohesive view of all changes across the network. This lets you manage all of the servers in a single view. Another aspect to look for in an FIM solution is advanced reporting of rollup information. Preferably, your FIM tool should have a sophisticated dashboard that lets you assess the state of your infrastructure at an unconventional level and subsequently drill down volumes of change data into actionable information.

                     

                    6. Simplified Rule Configuration

                     

                    Your file integrity monitoring solution ought to have a system to easily define monitoring guidelines for a server or device. It should also have a mechanism to duplicate those rules to many devices across your infrastructure.

                     

                    7. Real-Time Monitoring

                     

                    This feature protects the integrity of your IT infrastructure by comparing misconfigurations in real time against your internal standards or outside policies for compliance and security best practices.

                    TAGS

                    • File Integrity Monitoring
                    • FIM
                    • FIM Solution
                    • Prolonged Perimeter Protection
                    • Smarter Change Detection

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